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New Survey Shows That File Sharers Buy 30 Percent More Music

January 22, 2013 | Posted by Joseph Lee

Ars Technica reports that a new survey by Columbia University research center American Assembly has found that users of peer-to-peer file sharing software by 30% more music than those who don’t file share. The survey was commissioned by Google.

It found that the average US resident on a file sharing network has 2,000 songs in their library and 38% were bought legitimately. Digital music library owners not on file sharing networks have an average collection of 1,300 songs, with 45% legally acquired and the others ripped from CDs or copied. Even though a larger percentage of music from non P2P users’ collections was bought legally, a greater amount of music overall was bought by P2P users.

13% of US citizens use file sharing software. This increases to 20% when looking at people under the age of 20. The survey also showed that 8 out of 10 people think it’s okay to share copyrighted content with family. Six out of ten think it’s okay to share content with friends. Only between four and fifteen percent think it’s okay to upload the songs online.

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Joseph Lee

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