music / Reviews

Royal Thunder – “April Showers” Track Review

March 4, 2017 | Posted by David Hayter
6.5
The 411 Rating
Community Grade
12345678910
Your Grade
Loading...
Royal Thunder – “April Showers” Track Review  

Royal Thunder appear to simultaneously inhabit two contrasting planes of existence. Frontwoman Miny Parsons is a study in repression and rage: gritting her teeth and unleashing an onslaught of eye catching one liners (“You’ve got to tell them what they want to hear”, “we were never really innocent”, “that levy is breaching”) as well as some lovely plaintive coos. Taken in isolation the vocal track feels like it should rest a top a howling, growling, hard rock showstopper – the kind of single designed to kick down doors and storm ramparts. Instead, the rest of Royal Thunder have sculpted a slow burning, brooding and altogether understated arrangement.

“April Showers” twists in the wind (or should that be sashays amid the quagmire?) drawing out every attainable ounce of foreboding and gloom. Miny speaks to indecision and an impending ultimatum: some subconscious breaking point, and yet, while she may be on edge, the lingering grooves are content to stew and saunter, prolonging her stay in purgatory with some stately and controlled playing.

Far from creating an awkward contrast, the slow build sonics form a fitting torture chamber for their hanging-together-by-a-thread frontwoman. When it’s time for the guitar to solo, fittingly, the image of the levy is revisited, but rather than gallons of water smashing through the heart of the damn, the rolling notes suggest a slow overflow – wave upon wave coming to slowly drown any remaining hope.

It may not back the punch of knockout single, but “April Showers” is a deftly crafted, thoughtful and richly thematic taster of what’s to come on Wick.

6.5
The final score: review Average
The 411
Royal Thunder brood and groove portentously on “April Showers” as frontwoman Miny Parsons brutally roars and rasps her soul to shreds.
legend

article topics :

Royal Thunder, David Hayter