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Jim Ross Recalls Actually Seeing Part Of Owen Hart’s Fall At Over the Edge 1999

May 24, 2019 | Posted by Joseph Lee
Owen Hart

In the latest episode of Grilling JR, Jim Ross spoke about Owen Hart’s tragic fall at Over the Edge 1999 and revealed that he actually saw part of the accident when it happened. Here are highlights:

On how little he knew about the situation: “That’s a hell of an ad-lib, huh? The King and I had to process a lot of information that was fluid. It kept changing. It kept evolving. So it was hard to get your feet on the ground. ‘Where are we? What has happened? How is Owen, most importantly of all? And by the way, are we gonna go home now?’ Are we gonna do the show? What’s going on?’ So I was getting bits and pieces of information because those decisions were being made by Vince and the staff on the PPV side. Of course, everybody’s concern was Owen. But I was just getting bits and pieces of information, and that’s challenging. That’s really challenging. It wasn’t the last time I had to speak on that matter on the show.”

On if he saw the fall happen: “Interesting story. I saw part of it happen. I think the King, who was sitting at my right…two man booth at ringside…I think he may have seen Owen, I think he was looking up at the ceiling at Kemper at Kansas City. I was looking at my monitor. I’d become normally a prisoner of my monitor when I’m broadcasting because what you see on the monitor is what you gotta narrate. That’s the soundtrack that you’re looking for. It’s what you seeing there and how’s it make you feel and what you say. So where I saw Owen was shocking because he came right through my screen. Flash. Right down. It was like a falling star. Right out of Heaven. It’s amazing. And little did I know what symbolically that would mean later on, but I saw him flash through my monitor, little monitor, not a big TV like they use now, little bigger. Smaller monitor, but it was a blip. And then I looked up and I saw his impact on the top rope, the turnbuckle area and it was hard to process. It’s still hard to process. […] I looked back at it, caught it through my monitor and happened to look up and sitting right there, few feet away, and his body hit that top and it was like being expelled from a car wreck. It was so disturbing.”

On the immediate aftermath: “There was a lot of communication to the back. The camera guy could talk to the back, we had the audio guy that was there. There’s all kinds of techs that had communication abilities to talk to the back and I think everybody was on their phone so to speak, they’re on their headset to get word that ‘hey look, this is a bad thing out here.’ It was dark as I recall. It seemed to be dark. Maybe it’s just my mindset. Everybody knew right away. Here’s the thing: there were people in the audience and some of the EMT-type people, I think they believed it was part of the show. And some even thought it was a mannequin or something. He hits and I look and he hits and it’s like, ‘Wait a minute, what is that? What happened? What just happened? What the hell happened here?’ I remember the King got right out of his chair and ran over there. And I stayed back because somebody’s gotta stay there because…we’re the voice of the damn show! Can’t leave it. Can’t leave your post. So King went over there and King was over there for a few seconds and he came back to me and Jerry’s face was ashen white. White as snow. His eyes had teared over and he just looked at me, we gained eye contact. He just shook his head. No. So the King either had a premonition or just what he foresee was that we were seeing the last moments of his life flash before our very eyes because that’s certainly what happened. It was a treacherous day, man. Some of those memories are just brutal. I can only imagine how they are for the fans and most importantly his family. Not poor us. Not poor JR, not poor Jerry. But it was brutal. Absolutely brutal.”

If you use any of the quotes, please credit Grilling JR with an h/t to 411mania.com.

article topics :

Jim Ross, Owen Hart, Joseph Lee